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Coalition Films

The Off Camera Flash Tutorial

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or u can buy a flash meter <_< nah this is good shit bro,

 

you schould completly understand how this all works before you buy a flash meter

I've been trying to understand how its supposed to work (meters) but I dont get it. So, is this close to what your supposed to do?...

 

Meter the ambient (natural?) light. Say that says to shoot at F8, then you'd shoot at F11 but set your flashes to F8?

 

When would you need to meter your flashes?

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is this for is youre not using a flash meter, correct? because i remember foxxx telling me about this and this totally clears things up, wish i knew about this earlier, otherwise i wouldnt be sitting at the spot for 20 minutes figuring out calculations and such haha

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This idea of underexposing the ambient and having the flash output 1-2 stops more powerful than ambient is to be used regardless of a metering method. Handheld meters just make the task easier.

 

Speaking of Foxxx, where has he been lately?

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so if you just meter the ambient and then underexpose whats the point in having a flash meter?

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so if you just meter the ambient and then underexpose whats the point in having a flash meter?

To tell you if your flashes are putting out enough light or not.

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I've been trying to understand how its supposed to work (meters) but I dont get it. So, is this close to what your supposed to do?...

 

Meter the ambient (natural?) light. Say that says to shoot at F8, then you'd shoot at F11 but set your flashes to F8?

 

When would you need to meter your flashes?

no, if the ambient is f8 at 1/250, than u adjust your flashes to f/11 and your camera to f/11...if you want to do 2 stops, than flashes and camera to f/16. As for the other person the reason to buy a flash meter, its more exact than the dials...and it just makes the proccess easier and quicker..especially with multiple flashes. But its quite doable with out a meter, you just need to think a little more. A waste a little bit more time.

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The biggest misunderstanding (is that a word) is that your flashes need to have the same settings as the camera. I metered ambient at F/4 @1/250th, set the camera to 5.6, then just metered my flashes, one of them was f/4, and the rim was f/11, so I set it to f/8.

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I have a question so if all of this is based on ISO 100, and a full powered flashs guide number, and the distance the flash is away from the subject. Then if you didnt want to use full power and maybe half power would you just divide the flashes guide number in half and follow the same procedure. EX) you are using a 555 on half, and it says it is exposed at 250 @ f/9 and the flash is 10 feet away from the subject. So first I think you said to underexpose 2 stops so it would be 250 @ f/11? then you would divide the flashes guide number in half so a 555 would be a guide number of 75. So now you would get the outcome of the equation to be 7.5, and the closest aperature to that would be 7.1.

 

I think that is right or unless I did the wrong way of underexposing two stops, which I think you are supposed to do?

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I've never done any of this, but couldn't you just set up your flashes, set their powers to whatever you wanted, and just meter the scene? like use the test button on the transmitter and meter the scene and then adjust your camera accordingly. I'm not really articulating well enough, but does anybody get what I'm saying?

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I've never done any of this, but couldn't you just set up your flashes, set their powers to whatever you wanted, and just meter the scene? like use the test button on the transmitter and meter the scene and then adjust your camera accordingly. I'm not really articulating well enough, but does anybody get what I'm saying?

what happens if how you're flashes set up, are geared for a higher ambient. Say, your flashes are in position for an f5.6 ambient light (the real metering would be f4)...but the ambient is actually f8. you wouldnt be under exposing the photo at all, so it would be really fucked up...

 

I think thats what you're saying...

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So could someone explain the metering process in a step by step order? Matt sort of explained it but I got confused when I read it.

 

 

Meter ambient, set flashes for the ambient reading, then underexpose to some degree?

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1. Meter ambient

2. Under-expose ambient, if you want to (f/8 becomes 11

3. set up main flash

4. meter and set main flash (f/8 is f/8)

5. set up rimlight flash

6. meter rimlight flash, and set it by overexposing it a stop (f/8 becomes 4)

7. Take photo

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How much would you estimate all this cost?

A good flash setup?

 

Pocketwizard Kit (1 transmitter, 1 reciever) - $350

Extra pocketwizard reciever - $180

2x Sunpak 555 (from ebay) - $200

Sekonic L-358 - $250

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k may sound dumb but i'm kinda unclear still.

 

i have SB-800's and i understand the part with setting the flash's aperature and all that.

on the SB-800 you set the power until the distance shown on the LCD is correct.

i don't understand why the aperature on the flash would matter if you could still get the same difference on say f/4 instead of f/8 .. just different power settings.

 

does anyone even remotely understand what i am saying ? i could just be rambling ..

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well- shitty flashes don't have apertures.

 

decent ones with manual controls do.

 

 

and the reason that you can adjust the aperture & the power, when you might not even need to, is the same reason you can adjust aperture, shutter speed, and ISO on your camera.

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Aperture

 

Lens opening. The hole or opening formed by the metal leaf diaphragm inside the lens or the opening in a camera lens through which light passes to expose the film. The size of aperture is either fixed or adjustable. Aperture size is usually calibrated in f- numbers-the larger the number, the smaller the lens opening. Aperture affects depth of field, the smaller the aperture, the greater is the zone of sharpness, the bigger the aperture, the zone of sharpness is reduced. The hole or opening formed by the metal leaf diaphragm inside the lens; controls amount of light and depth of field, prevents vignetting and reduces lens aberrations; the size of the aperture is indicated by its f-number, i.e., the ratio of the diameter of the opening to the focal length of the lens; a large aperture is indicated by a small numerical f-number.

 

------------------------------

 

flashes change output to expose properly at a given aperture, they don't actually have an aperture. i'm sure most of you know this and it's just a term thing but i dont want beginners to be confused.

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A good flash setup?

 

Pocketwizard Kit (1 transmitter, 1 reciever) - $350

Extra pocketwizard reciever - $180

2x Sunpak 555 (from ebay) - $200

Sekonic L-358 - $250

I dont see why 2 544's wouldnt be sufficient because you could save like 100 bucks right there and...the 544's are still more powerfull than the 285

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